Duke scientists identify 'silenced genes'

Duke University scientists now have identified these "silenced genes," creating the first map of this unique group of about 200 genes believed to play a profound role in people's health.
More intriguing, the work marks an important step in studying how our environment - food, stress, pollution - interacts with genes to help determine why some people get sick and others do not.
"What we have is a bag of gold nuggets," lead researcher Dr. Randy Jirtle said about the collection of "imprinted" genes. The team's findings were published online Friday by the journal Genome Research.
Next comes work to prove exactly what role these genes play. "Some will be real gold and some will be fool's gold," Jirtle added.

newsobserver.com Duke scientists identify 'silenced genes'

Rite Aid Stores in West Selling a Paternity Test Kit

The move into the pharmacy is another in the spread of genetic testing directly to consumers. Many genetic tests, for health and diet advice, ancestry and paternity, are already available directly to consumers through the Internet. But Sorenson hopes the corner drugstore will appeal to different customers, including those who do not want to wait three or five days for a kit to arrive in the mail after ordering it over the Internet.


Rite Aid Stores in West Selling a Paternity Test Kit - New York Times

Just Off Insular Senate Floor, Life of the Uninsured Intrudes

Some private studies suggest that one in three Americans under the age of 65 may have been uninsured at some time in the last two years.

U.S. Senators have access to a wide range of insurance options through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. Congress has its own “attending physician” — actually, a team of 5 doctors and 14 nurses who work in the Capitol and nearby Congressional office buildings. Lawmakers can fill prescriptions at a small pharmacy in the Capitol. For more serious problems, they can use nearby military hospitals.

Just Off Insular Senate Floor, Life of the Uninsured Intrudes - New York Times

Man Who Helped Start Stem Cell War May End It


Dr. Thomson’s laboratory at the University of Wisconsin bwas one of two that in 1998 plucked stem cells from human embryos for the first time, destroying the embryos in the process and touching off a divisive national debate. And on Tuesday, his laboratory was one of two that reported a new way to turn ordinary human skin cells into what appear to be embryonic stem cells without ever using a human embryo.

Man Who Helped Start Stem Cell War May End It - New York Times


On Wisconsin ..On Wisconsin...
. . . . FORWARD

Scientists Bypass Need for Embryo to Get Stem Cells

Two teams of scientists reported yesterday that they had turned human skin cells into what appear to be embryonic stem cells without having to make or destroy an embryo — a feat that could quell the ethical debate troubling the field. All they had to do, the scientists said, was add four genes. The genes reprogrammed the chromosomes of the skin cells, making the cells into blank slates that should be able to turn into any of the 220 cell types of the human body, be it heart, brain, blood or bone. Until now, the only way to get such human universal cells was to pluck them from a human embryo several days after fertilization, destroying the embryo in the process

Scientists Bypass Need for Embryo to Get Stem Cells - New York Times

Cannabis Compound May Stop Metastatic Breast Cancer

The compound found in cannabis, called cannabidiol (CBD), inhibits a gene, Id-1, that researchers believe is responsible for the metastatic process that spreads cells from the original tumor throughout the body.

Cannabis Compound May Stop Metastatic Breast Cancer - Yahoo! News

Smok'em if ya gott'em but then again the lung cancer might get ya instead

Cell Insights May Predict Breast Cancer's Spread

U.S. researchers believe they're on the way to solving a major question about breast cancer: Which women have a type of lesion in their breast duct that will progress to invasive disease?
"It's an exciting step forward -- people have been trying to get traction on this big clinical problem for about 40 years, and this is a big crack in the door," said lead researcher Thea Tlsty, a professor of pathology at the University of California, San Francisco.

Cell Insights May Predict Breast Cancer's Spread - Yahoo! News

Report Urges Regulation of Genetic Tests

That committee's draft report, released Tuesday, found significant gaps in regulation and called on the government and private businesses to work together. Some testing, such as those for caffeine metabolism and fetus gender testing are "skirting the boundaries" of current regulation, the report concluded. It said the Clinical Laboratories Improvement Amendments of 1988, which cover lab regulations, should be expanded to cover genetic testing

Report Urges Regulation of Genetic Tests - Forbes.com

Monsanto is developing genetically modified plants that use RNA interference to kill the insects that eat them

Researchers have created plants that kill insects by disrupting their gene expression. The crops, which initiate a gene-silencing response called RNA interference, are a step beyond existing genetically modified crops that produce toxic proteins. Because the new crops target particular genes in particular insects, some researchers suggest that they will be safer and less likely to have unintended effects than other genetically modified plants. Others warn that it is too early to make such predictions and that the plants should be carefully tested to ensure that they do not pose environmental problems. But most researchers agree that it's unlikely that eating these plants would have adverse effects on humans.


Technology Review: Crops That Shut Down Pests' Genes

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